Ravens can remember human faces.
Source: Original photo by Kasturi Roy/ Unsplash

Ravens can remember human faces.

Ravens are smart — really smart. Studies have shown that they can use tools, remember human faces, and even plan for the future. This behavior cuts both ways for humans: Edgar Allan Poe’s favorite birds have demonstrated a tendency to both favor people who show them kindness and hold grudges against those who treat them poorly. These preferences aren’t fleeting, either — they may last for years.

Ravens mate for life.
Ready to Reveal?
Confirm your email to reveal the answer

By subscribing you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Incorrect.
It's a Fact
Like all corvids, ravens are referred to as socially monogamous. This means that mated pairs stick together for life. Other birds that do likewise include the bald eagle, black vulture, and whooping cranes.

Raven intelligence is comparable in some cases to that of chimpanzees, which are among the smartest members of the animal kingdom. What’s more, they aren’t the only ones upending the “bird brain” stereotype: Other members of the corvid family — namely crows, jays, and magpies — have displayed exceptional intelligence as well. So the next time you encounter a raven, be sure you get on its good side. You may make a new friend who won’t forget you anytime soon.

Make Every Day More Interesting
Recieve Facts Directly In Your Inbox. Daily.

By subscribing you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Numbers Don’t Lie
Life expectancy of a wild raven; those in captivity can live for 40 years
10-15
Number of lines in Poe’s “The Raven”
108
Average wingspan (in inches) of an adult raven
46
Ravens belonging to Odin in Norse mythology
2
A group of ravens is called a(n) _______.
A group of ravens is called a(n) unkindness.
Ready to Reveal?
Confirm your email to reveal the answer

By subscribing you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Think Twice
The Tower of London has a Ravenmaster.

English lore has long claimed that the kingdom will fall if ravens ever leave the Tower of London. With that in mind, it’s little surprise that the Ravenmaster has been an official — and important — position at the landmark since the 1960s. The current Ravenmaster is popular on social media and has written a well-received memoir about his experiences tending to the clever birds, whose small stature belies the near-mythical status they occupy in England’s collective imagination.

Article image
You might also like
7 Flying Creatures That Aren't Birds
From flying fish to flying squirrels, there are plenty of unique aerodynamic animals around the world.